M.S. in Integrative Cell Biology

Goal

The goal of the MS program in Integrative Cell Biology is to train students in the basic science and methodology of Integrative Cell Biology, to allow them to apply this knowledge in jobs as research assistants in academy, the  industry, or as teachers in primary or secondary education. Students graduating with an MS degree often obtain additional education in PhD and MD programs.

Financial Support

Although M.S. students are not provided a stipend or tuition remission, all research supplies and equipment required for their research projects are provided at no cost to the student. Tuition for academic year (2016-2017) is $1,043/credit hour, and MS students are required to take a minimum of 24 credits over the two year course of study. For more information regarding Tuition and Fees for the Graduate Programs at Loyola University Medical Center please click here

Curriculum

The basic curriculum includes Cell Biology, Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, Systems Biology, Methods Biology, Immunology, Neuroanatomy, Histology, Bioethics, Biostatistics & Gross Anatomy. Students have the opportunity to take other more specialized courses during their second year of study. In addition to class work, students also participate in both journal club and a seminar series.

For the most part, MS students complete their course requirements (24 Credit hours) during their first year. There is the option of withholding a few credit hours for the third semester in order to take a course only offered every other year or one which couldn't be taken during the first semester due to the Core Curriculum.

Course of study

Graduate classes are small, and there is a strong emphasis on the current scientific literature. The program holds a weekly Journal Club where students present seminars on recent important research articles of their choice. Here students closely interact with each other and a faculty member. Students present recent journal articles and participate in stimulating research discussions. During the spring semester, in addition to journal article presentations, students are also given the opportunity to practice short talks in an atmosphere similar to that which they will experience at national and international meetings. Journal club is intended to facilitate and assist in the development of student’s presentation and critical reading skills, in addition to adding to their scientific knowledge.

Seminar is a weekly gathering of faculty and students. Visiting speakers present either a topic of personal interest or a report of their current research. These gatherings are intended for both stimulating discussion and as an educational supplement to departmental research activity. In late May/early June, the Departmental Graduate Program hosts a Research in Progress retreat at a local venue. The day is dedicated to short oral presentations by CBN & Anatomy graduate students from second- final year, including a few minutes of questions at the end of each presentation.

For the most part, MS students complete their course requirements (24 Credit hours) during their first year. There is the option of withholding a few credit hours for the third semester in order to take a course only offered every other year or one which couldn't be taken during the first semester due to the Core Curriculum.

The remainder of the student's experience in the program is dedicated to thesis research. Students choose a mentor and lab to perform their research and begin progress towards successful completion of a thesis